HolycombeBlog

The six-acre site is built in the grounds of a Norman castle, the legacy of which is a splendid water-filled moat harbouring carp among the bulrushes. Local mystics have it that Holycombe was a sacred Neolithic site, evidenced by six converging ley lines, so it would have been a shame not to add a stone circle to venerate that unusual spiritual asset. The irony is that this rich heritage lay beneath a scrapyard until Sally and Andy Birtwell built their eco-home and house of healing, overlooked by an alternative campsite perfect for purists and – with four furnished bell tents and a geodesic dome – part-timers.

Holycombe (taking its name from combe ‘valley’ and the nearby Holy Well spring) has a natural beauty to match its rich history, adjoining Whichford Wood (a wildlife-filled designated Site of Special Interest). It’s also handily located a short walk from the Norman Knight, a classic Cotswold pub. So after a long ramble, or a pint up the road, you can light a campfire as dusk settles on the valley, and banter long into the night about whether ley lines really do exist, or ponder on what might be lurking at the bottom of that mysterious moat.

Visit website Holycombe Campsite »

Date posted: April 22, 2014 | Author:

Categories: Campsites Local Attractions Places